Flatiron School

My Journey Of Learning Programming Through Flatiron School #44

My Journey Of Learning Programming Through Flatiron School #44

My name is Mason Ellwood, and I’m currently working on Flatiron School’s Online Full Stack Web Development Program. Each week, I’ll be writing about my experience, what I’m learning, and tips on learning to code.

I recently read online that The Flatiron School recently was bought by WeWork. In the post I was reading yesterday on techcrunch (https://techcrunch.com/2017/10/23/wework-acquires-flatiron-school/), it explained that WeWork is a monster co-working company valuing in at roughly 20 million dollars. The deal terms where not disclosed to the public but what the public does know is that this means free tuition to any WeWork employees! Which is sweet if you are apart of that organization, less cool if you are not.

What WeWork is, I guess basically they work with large and small company creating work environments. The closest thing that I can relate to this, that we have here in Arizona is Cohoots (https://cohoots.com/). Creating fast work environments for startups and organizations that need a space fast and cheap.

The reason for them selling is unclear to me. But the techcrunch article stated:

“The news of the deal comes just a week after Flatiron School settled with the NY Attorney General for $375,000 after operating without a license from the NY State Education Department and improperly marketed and promoted its job placement and average starting salary of its graduates.”

But it sounds like Neumann’s is really looking forward to there new partnership and cant wait to get involved in what The Flatiron School has to offer saying:

“Our culture is one in which we are always ready to do more, to learn more, and we are proud to expand our offering with this new platform for learning. In Flatiron, we have found a partner who shares our vision of connecting people — through space, design, technology and community — and understands that those connections are what humanizes the way we work and live. We are all students for life. I am excited to welcome the entire Flatiron School team of educators, engineers and innovators to WeWork to continue to learn, together.”

  • Neumann

In another article, they mentioned that this move is similar to what LinkedIn did with their deal with Lynda.com. Creating a one stop shop for both learning and training, “free of charge” with there service.

“WeWork hopes to become a physical manifestation of the same ideals: a physical space where people can work, live, snack, network, and learn.”

  •  Fast Company (https://www.fastcompany.com/40484965/wework-just-bought-nyc-coding-bootcamp-flatiron-school)

What is most interest to read is that because of this recent acquisition there will be now more transparency into the real states of graduation success.

“As a part of the settlement, Flatiron will have to be more transparent about exactly how many of its grads are getting starting salaries of roughly $75,000 and how many are actually employed (versus those who are freelancing or interning). The organization will also have to get a license from the State Education Department even though it does not grant degrees for its courses.”

  • Fast Company (https://www.fastcompany.com/40484965/wework-just-bought-nyc-coding-bootcamp-flatiron-school)

So what this means for me…..

Most likely nothing haha, I will continue school like I did before, slowly poking my way through Javascript. But this doesn’t discredit that there will be changes that will be made. But it is too soon to tell what this all means. I do want to say that this post is no reflection on how I view the school. This is merely a reflection on a few articles I read online to mirroring the information I had accessible to me.

 

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My Journey Of Learning Programming Through Flatiron School #39

My Journey Of Learning Programming Through Flatiron School #43

My name is Mason Ellwood, and I’m currently working on Flatiron School’s Online Full Stack Web Development Program. Each week, I’ll be writing about my experience, what I’m learning, and tips on learning to code.

Building culture at work always seemed a little odd to me… I mean the idea itself does not seem odd; building a group of people up and creating a positive and active workforce all driving towards the same goal. Yah I mean it seems simple enough. It also seems like such a huge focus of so many companies, constantly being retold about the culture that a company has, and told and showcases like a gift to the workforce. Almost as if to say “hey if you work somewhere else, then you will be miserable”, because they do not have this hyper-defined culture that is cultivated at your current location. Then why is that so hard to find?

I have worked at a lot of companies, meaning I have worked at less than 10 and for some reason, it is hard to find a culture at these places that actually reflect this hard defined temperament of the general population of the workforce. But when you find it you really find it, it’s almost a slap in the face. It’s almost odd and kinda takes you back a step.

When I started The Flatiron School, I was not expecting to find anything more there then what I had with any of my other online class I have taken in college. And I don’t know about you, but every single class I took online I basically thought I was taking myself. On a solo mission to figure something out. But here’s where I was slapped in the face.

The Flatiron School was different, and yah almost odd. How are all these students, who have never met each other SO invested in each other and in the curriculum?! I have made a friend in an online class, I mean COME ON?! I don’t know how they did it but they really did. They have created a culture at The Flatiron School that not only loves what they do, but are willing to set aside their time to help each other. If that does not speak for the curriculum I don’t know what does.

I know this post has nothing to do with code, but I am having fun in an online class. I know it’s weird… So hats off to them if anything haha.

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My Journey Of Learning Programming Through Flatiron School #42 - ...

My Journey Of Learning Programming Through Flatiron School #42 – …

My name is Mason Ellwood, and I’m currently working on Flatiron School’s Online Full Stack Web Development Program. Each week, I’ll be writing about my experience, what I’m learning, and tips on learning to code.

So as you all know I finally started learning Javascript! Which is amazing and has helped me out at work immensely. But like all things that you begin to learn for the first time, it becomes a real pain in the butt until you slowly grasp how everything fits together. But I have been amazed at how quickly those pieces are fitting together once I grasped my first OO programming language. How all these pieces fit together and everything is connected in a sense to complete a task.

My time that I have to spend through The Flatiron School so far has taught me to think of things in a different way. How to think of things at a larger scale to complete a task and bring that skill in a tangible form to the workplace.

So for this first lesson, I will give a brief overview of Javascript and we will go through what I have learned together as I am going over it. So you can better understand how I have gone from writing zero Javascript to hopefully being proficient in the language.

As you probably already know, Javascript is the universally accepted language of the internet. As far as a developer standard you should know how to use it.

JavaScript is a dynamic, untyped, and interpreted programming language; it is prototype-based and supports both object-oriented and functional approaches.” – The Flatiron School

If you have never written any Javascript go ahead and open up your console and we will try it out together. To open up the console simple right-click anywhere on this screen and select Inspect. Go to the top of the dialogue box and select Console. This area that you are now it is considered a sandbox. If you are using a mac press Command + K and it will clear the screen for you.

My Journey Of Learning Programming Through Flatiron School #42 - ...

In this sandbox environment, you are now able to write and execute code directly in this environment. If you have been following along in my previous posts this is very similar to the IRB environment. A sandbox if you think of like a sandbox, it is an open area where you can do or make anything you can think of, with some limitations.

Remember how we could play in sandboxes as kids: building castles, moats, and shaping an entire world without worrying about the consequences outside of that world? In programming, sandboxes work the same way: they’re environments that we have complete control over, but whose contents don’t spill into the outside world.)” – The Flatiron School

Inside this Sandbox environment type alert(“Hello World”); And check out the response. You should be given the response below.

My Journey Of Learning Programming Through Flatiron School #42 - ...

This should give you a popup window that prints out the information added to the screen.

Congratulations you have officially written your first lines of Javascript!

A large part of programming is experimentation — we come up with a hypothesis (how we think something should work) and test it with code.” – The Flatiron School

Javascript is a means of completing a task, and with you as the developer thinking about how things should be done without a clear picture to how it should be done. There are endless possibilities to doing the same thing with Javascript, but it is your job as the developer to chose that path.

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My Journey Of Learning Programming Through Flatiron School #39

My Journey Of Learning Programming Through Flatiron School #41

My name is Mason Ellwood, and I’m currently working on Flatiron School’s Online Full Stack Web Development Program. Each week, I’ll be writing about my experience, what I’m learning, and tips on learning to code.

At work, like all things I have encountered large and small issues, but that is like all things. But I have been reflecting a lot with my role in the company and how to best perform in my front-end developer role at Fyresite.

So I have been at this company now for roughly 6 weeks and almost all my energy has been directed at one project, Prepass. They build electronic tolling software for truckers, and my role is to write out the functionality of the site, with one other coworker Paul. This has been a crash course for me, diving head first into WordPress, php, html, css, ajax, and javascript. But this post is not so much about the languages I have used, but more how I have began to approach the challenges of building out this site.

When I first began at Fyresite, I was given access to the sketch doc that included all the designs for the pages that I was in charge of building out. Which after a few weeks I was closer and closer to having a working model of the site. But constantly I was met with having to add functionality and everything I had built needed to be altered in some way. So the hours are stacking and stacking, having to constantly rebuilding what I had made, because it didn’t quite include all the functionality that the client was asking of me. This left me with a lot of frustration having to basically start over on some major pages on the site.

I have since completed the projects that were asked of me, but I am slowly learning to really take my time and pour myself into thinking a lot about what the client may also want with what a simple sketch mock may include. Programming for the future rather than what is immediately asked of me so the product is amenable dynamic enough so that I won’t have to build for future problems that the client may want. Build for their needs, not the immediate needs that I see to quickly complete the project. Thinking about programming in this way, will save me inmens time in the future and make the transition to handing the client a final project easier.

This has translated a lot into how I view my lessons with The Flatiron School. Being able to see how something may have to work for the future, rather than what I need it to do to complete a task.

In school, I have finally begun the javascript course and I couldn’t be having more fun. Not only is it making my life so much easier at work, but it makes learning so much greater with a goal of application.

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My Journey Of Learning Programming Through Flatiron School #40

My Journey Of Learning Programming Through Flatiron School #40

My name is Mason Ellwood, and I’m currently working on Flatiron School’s Online Full Stack Web Development Program. Each week, I’ll be writing about my experience, what I’m learning, and tips on learning to code.

For this post, I am going to deviate from my super interesting posts about servers and talk a little about the job that I recently started at Fyresite.

As you all know roughly four weeks ago I started working at Fyresite, as one of their Front-End Developers. And so far I am really enjoying my time there. But I don’t want to talk about how happy I am, and I doubt you really want to read about that.

As there Front-End guy it basically has been a crash course into the Front-End world and just how much I still need to learn to quicken my pace and keep up. I am fairly adequate in low-level languages but with a new job, there is always a learning curve into new technologies and how they go about building out custom sites that sometimes seems over my head.

My first week, I had a full site drop into my lap. 10 plus pages, custom layout with WordPress, with three other developers work compiled onto it. Giving me both a launching point to get up and running and also a lot to sift through to see how they have been going about building this thing out. With this project, I have had to brush up on many different languages and some that I never thought this early on I would be using.

So roughly this posts purpose is not to scare you away in an “I don’t know enough” fashion, as is how I saw it for so long. But once you know some core web fundamentals, it will be easy to use what you know to apply them to whatever projects that come your way.

 

My Journey Of Learning Programming Through Flatiron School #40

My first project as a paid Front-End Web Developer I have been very accustoming to using HTML, CSS, WordPress platform, Javascript, jQuery, PHP, FTP, SQL, and AJAX. The software I have been using includes Photoshop, Cyberduck, Atom, MAMP, Sequel Pro, Sketch, Insomnia, and the GitHub Desktop app. Like I said it is a lot to take in. Currently we are working on a desktop app that uses SASS, NODE, and React. And again, I am in my fourth week of work. So what does all this mean?

Basically how I see it, is that is that you will never be absolutely ready to enter into the Development world, me included. But like all great developers you have to see yourself as a useful multi tool.

What do you need to and pulling that broad knowledge base you have to find useful solutions to problems. The job of a developer is to fix what is broken, and being the reason is broke in the first place may leave you in a weird spot. But it should not. I walked into this job, knowing only the near sighted fundamentals of many different languages, where Fyresite comes in, is allowing you to use what you have learned and giving you a platform to make solutions and solve a problem.

It is no different than school, or even The Flatiron School. They display a usable solution to a problem that you may encounter. And give you an an example of a situation to solve using the knowledge you have gained. Even though the environment varies, you still have to think about the solution the same way. This is one of the greatest strengths I am able to walk away from The Flatiron School, a stable platform to launch myself off of to solve problems.

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My Journey Of Learning Programming Through Flatiron School #39

My Journey Of Learning Programming Through Flatiron School #39

My name is Mason Ellwood, and I’m currently working on Flatiron School’s Online Full Stack Web Development Program. Each week, I’ll be writing about my experience, what I’m learning, and tips on learning to code.

If you have any Ruby experience you may be wondering why we have not gotten into Ruby on Rails yet…. Which is a valid question because of all the tools that come preset with it. But try to think of is this way. In the school, they cover setting up an ORM from scratch and building out your database. This takes a lot of time and energy and tracks through an extensive learning curve to complete. Setting up Sinatra automates this process. So why didn’t we just start with Sinatra?

Without knowing what an ORM does precisely, then we may not quite understand why Sinatra is breaking. Which it will do, one of the main jobs of a developer is to break and fix what is broken. Without first knowing what an ORM is and how it interacts with Ruby and your server, you may find it a lot harder to understand how to fix it. Spend time to dive into your code and understand the core concepts before jumping the gun, which could bite you in the end.

The same goes with The Flatiron School’s extensive dive into Rack. Why don’t they just jump to Rails which automates what Rack does for us? Well because like we said above you have to look at your learning curve in steps. Without knowing what is going on under the hood, you may have problems fixing your program when it breaks.

With Rack you will be able to better understand how it interacts with HTTP and once you step into the Rails world knowing how Rack is translating that information will greatly benefit you. So why use Rack? When looking at something like Facebook and Youtube it is hard to understand all the moving parts. This is where Rack comes in. Rack at its simplest level sets up a connection with the server and is what Rails is built on top of. Before we get to Rails lets better understand why Rack does and how it interacts with HTTP.

To interact with Rack we need to create a class that responds to a single method. This method will return a status code, any headers, and the body. All this can be done with the Rack::Response object. When setting this this response always end in a #finish. By default Rack set up your status code for you.

My Journey Of Learning Programming Through Flatiron School #39

The code above will run whenever there is a request received. With the code above we need to set up one more system that connects you to that HTTP request, which sends it through to your #call method, which then serves that responds to the browser.  We do this with the use of a config.ru file and the rack command.

My Journey Of Learning Programming Through Flatiron School #39

Running this code we then run rack up config.ru

My Journey Of Learning Programming Through Flatiron School #39

The port that is returned to you will set up a local environment (http://localhost:9292/). Using this url will display your data in the browser. The localhost is the server name on your computer.

And just like that, you have made a connection with the server! I know this was a weird article and it may not make sense. We will get into the file structure later on, but I hope this clears up some of what Rack is and what its purpose is. Thank you for reading, I will see you next week to dive a little deeper.

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